CBD oil tincture with background image of industrial cannabis plants
CBD oil tincture with background image of industrial cannabis plants

How THC Is Metabolized: The Science Behind What Happens to It in the Body

how thc is metabolized

When you consume THC, it is rapidly broken down and modified into molecules known as metabolites. At least 80 different metabolites are formed from THC, and each one may have its own effects on the body’s endocannabinoid system. These metabolites are stored in body fat and are gradually eliminated from the body through feces and urine. In this article, we will take a closer look at what happens to THC when it is metabolized by the body.

What is THC and what does it do in the body?

THC is the main psychoactive component of cannabis. When it enters the body, it is broken down and converted into a variety of metabolites. These metabolites have a range of effects on the body’s endocannabinoid system. Some of these metabolites are stored in fat cells and gradually eliminated from the body over time. Others bind to cannabinoid receptors and produce the plant’s signature “high.”

Cannabis plants contain more than 100 different cannabinoids, but THC is by far the most well-known and researched. THC binds to cannabinoid receptors throughout the body, but its effects vary depending on which part of the brain it binds to. In general, THC produces feelings of relaxation, euphoria, and increased appetite. It can also cause impaired coordination and memory, anxiety, and paranoia.

At high doses, THC can induce hallucinations and psychosis.

THC is absorbed into the bloodstream through the lungs or stomach. Once it’s in the blood, it binds to cannabinoid receptors throughout the body. These receptors are found in the brain, nervous system, organs, and tissues. THC produces its effects by binding to these receptors and activating them.

The body’s endocannabinoid system is a network of cannabinoid receptors and other molecules that play a role in regulating many different functions. These functions include memory, movement, pain perception, mood, appetite, and more. THC activates cannabinoid receptors and alters the function of the endocannabinoid system.

Cannabinoid receptors are found in all mammals, and they’re a key part of the endocannabinoid system. There are two main types of cannabinoid receptors: CB₁ and CB₂.

CB₁ receptors are found primarily in the brain and nervous system. They’re involved in regulating mood, memory, appetite, and pain perception.

THC binds to CB₁ receptors and produces its psychoactive effects.

CB₂ receptors are found mostly in the immune system. They play a role in inflammation and pain perception.

THC also binds to CB₂ receptors, but this interaction isn’t well understood.

The endocannabinoid system is a complex system that plays an important role in the body. THC interacts with this system in a variety of ways, producing a range of effects.

More research is needed to better understand the potential therapeutic and adverse effects of THC and other cannabinoids.

How is THC metabolized and what are the metabolites?

The metabolism of THC is a complex process that produces numerous metabolites. These metabolites are responsible for the wide range of effects that THC has on the body. The most well-known metabolite of THC is delta-nine-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC is responsible for the psychoactive effects of cannabis. However, it is only one of many potential metabolites. Other potential metabolites include: cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), and tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). Each of these metabolites has different effects on the body, and they all contribute to the overall experience of cannabis.

The metabolism of THC begins in the liver, where it is converted into 11-hydroxy-THC. This metabolite is then rapidly distributed to the brain, where it produces the psychoactive effects of cannabis. 11-Hydroxy-THC is also metabolized into THC-COOH, which is then excreted in the urine.

What are the effects of THC metabolites?

Marijuana is a drug that is made from the dried leaves and flowers of the hemp plant Cannabis sativa. The main active ingredient in marijuana is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. When marijuana is smoked, the THC passes from the lungs into the bloodstream, which carries it to the brain and other organs throughout the body. THC and its metabolites are stored in the body’s fat cells and are gradually released over time.

THC is metabolized in the liver by enzymes into more than 80 different metabolites, including 11-OH-THC (11-nor-delta- nine-tetrahydrocannabinol), which is a potent active metabolite of THC, and THCCOOH (11-nor-delta-nine-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid), which is a inactive metabolite. The effects of THC metabolites depend on how they are metabolized by the body and how they interact with other drugs in the system. Some of the more common effects include:

  • -Drowsiness
  • -Slowed reaction time
  • -Impaired memory
  • -Reduced coordination
  • -Anxiety or paranoia
  • -Short-term psychosis (in high doses)
  • -Increased heart rate
  • -Decreased blood pressure, which can lead to hypotension (low blood pressure)

Long-term effects of THC metabolites are not well understood. Some studies suggest that there may be an increased risk of developing cancer, but the evidence is inconclusive. There is also some evidence to suggest that THC metabolites may contribute to cognitive impairments in heavy users, but again, the evidence is inconclusive. More research is needed to understand the long-term effects of THC metabolites on the human body.

How long does it take for THC to be metabolized?

The amount of time it takes for THC to be metabolized can depend on a variety of factors, including how much and how often a person smokes. In general, however, the body will eliminate THC within a few days.

Are there any risks associated with THC metabolism?

There are some risks associated with THC metabolism, though they are generally considered to be minor. The main risk is that THC can be stored in fat cells, and it may take some time for the body to completely metabolize all of the THC. This means that someone who smokes frequently may have detectable levels of THC in their system for longer than someone who smokes less often.

Other risks include impaired liver function and increased risk of heart attack or stroke. However, these risks are relatively rare and tend to be associated with heavy marijuana use.

Overall, the risks associated with THC metabolism are considered to be minor. The main risk is that THC can be stored in fat cells, which may take some time for the body to completely metabolize. Other risks include impaired liver function and increased risk of heart attack or stroke; however, these are relatively rare and tend to be associated with heavy marijuana use. If you have any concerns about THC metabolism, speak with your doctor.

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